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Strokesaurus


Word Definition

Palliative care

Palliative care is specialised care and support for people who are nearing the end of their lives. Palliative care can be provided in the home, a hospital, a residential aged care facility or a hospice.
Palliative care is for people who are near the end of their life.

It can be given: 
  • At home 
  • In a hospital 
  • In an aged care home
  • In a hospice

Paralysis

Inability to move part of the body.
Paralysis is when you can’t move a part of your body.

Paresis

Incomplete paralysis or weakness of the limbs.

Paresis is when you have trouble moving a part of your body. 

It is not as serious as paralysis.

Parietal lobe

The part of the brain that is important for feeling things and for being aware of your surroundings.
The parietal lobe is a part of your brain.

It helps you feel things.

It helps you know what’s going on around you.

Participation

Involvement in a life situation.
Involvement in a life situation.

Participation restrictions

Problems an individual may experience in involvement in life situations.
Problems an individual may experience in involvement in life situations.

PBS

Pharmaceutical benefits scheme
Pharmaceutical benefits scheme

PE

Pulmonary embolism
Pulmonary embolism

PEG

Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy
Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

Penumbral-based imaging

Brain imaging that uses advanced MRI or CT angiography imaging to detect parts of the brain where the blood supply has been compromised but the tissue is still viable.
Brain imaging that uses advanced MRI or CT angiography imaging to detect parts of the brain where the blood supply has been compromised but the tissue is still viable.

Perception

The way our brain understands what it sees, feels, smells, tastes and hears.
Perception is the way your brain understands the messages your body sends it. 

This includes how you: 
  • See things
  • Feel things
  • Smell things
  • Taste things
  • Hear things

Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

Tube that is placed through the person’s stomach wall to feed them.
Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is a type of surgery. 

It helps you if you can’t eat or swallow. 

Doctors put a tube through your stomach wall.

Special food can be put into the tube. 

It goes into your stomach to feed you.

PFO

Patent faramen ovale
Patent faramen ovale

pgSGA

Patient-generated subjective global assessment
Patient-generated subjective global assessment

Pharmaceutical benefits scheme

A scheme whereby the costs of prescription medicine are subsidised by the Australian Government to make them more affordable.
A scheme whereby the costs of prescription medicine are subsidised by the Australian Government to make them more affordable.

Phonological deficits

Language deficits characterised by impaired recognition and/or selection of speech sounds.
Language deficits characterised by impaired recognition and/or selection of speech sounds.

Physiotherapist

Physiotherapists can work with someone after a stroke to improve the way they sit, stand, walk and exercise. Physiotherapists work on movement, muscle strength, sensation, coordination and fitness.
A physiotherapist is a type of health worker. 

They can help you with: 
  • Sitting
  • Standing
  • Walking 
  • Exercise

Plaque

Fatty cholesterol deposits found along the inside of artery walls that lead to atherosclerosis and stenosis of the arteries.
Plaque is mainly made up of fat, cholesterol and calcium. 

It can build up on your artery walls. 

Your arteries can become blocked.

Plasticity

Also known as neuroplasicity. The ability of the brain to change. After a stroke, pathways in the brain can change so that undamaged parts of the brain can take over the jobs of damaged areas.
Plasticity is when your brain heals itself. 

When you have a stroke, your brain can change.

Healthy parts of your brain can take over the jobs of damaged areas.

It is also called neuroplasicity.

Platelets

Structures found in blood that are known primarily for their role in coagulation or clotting.
Platelets are a part of your blood. 

They help your blood form clots when you get a cut.

PPV

Positive predictive value
Positive predictive value

Primary care

Health services provided locally by professionals such as GP’s, district nurses, pharmacists, dentists and optometrists.
Primary care is a type of health care. 

It is provided by people like GPs, district nurses, pharmacists, dentists and optometrists.

It is usually your first point of contact with the health system.

Proprioception

Ability to sense of the relative position of neighbouring parts of the body and strength of effort being employed in movement.
Proprioception is your ability to where the different parts of your body are.

Prothrombotic

A tendency to form blood clots too easily.
Prothrombotic is when your body forms blood clots too easily.

Pseudobulbar effect

Also known as emotional lability. Uncontrollable outbursts of emotion (such as laughing to crying) without cause. After a stroke, it may only last a few weeks or continue for a long period.
Pseudobulbar effect is when you suddenly laugh or cry for no reason. 

It can happen when you have a stroke. 

It can last for a few weeks, or for a longer time. 

It is also called emotional lability.

Psychologist

A psychologist or clinical psychologist can help if you are felling depressed or anxious, or are experiencing any other emotions that are making life difficult. Talking to a psycholigist can help if you or your family is having trouble getting used to life after stroke.
A psychologist or clinical psychologist is a type of health worker. 

They can help if you are feeling depressed or anxious. 

They can help if you or your family is having trouble getting used to life after stroke.

Pulmonary embolism

Blockage of the pulmonary artery (which carries blood from the heart to the lungs) with a solid material, usually a blood clot or fat, that has travelled there via the circulatory system.
Blockage of the pulmonary artery (which carries blood from the heart to the lungs) with a solid material, usually a blood clot or fat, that has travelled there via the circulatory system.